SnapType App For Children With Learning Disabilities

SnapType App For Children With Learning Disabilities

SnapType is an app that was created by a team couple - a man named Ben, and his wife, Amberlynn Slavin. This app enables children with learning disabilities.

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SnapType is an app that was created by a team that is in fact, a couple – a man named Ben, and his wife, Amberlynn Slavin. This app enables children with learning disabilities to do their assignments easily by taking photos of the assignment worksheets and then typing the answers without writing them down.

The app was an idea generated by Amberlynn. She is a pediatric occupational therapist. During her occupational therapy graduate fieldwork, she had an experience with a fifth-grade student who was having a learning disability that made his handwriting very untidy. The condition is known as dysgraphia.

Due to this, his occupational therapist tried different ways of helping him with no success. At one time, he even tried scanning the assignments for the student to type in answers but it was exhausting and time-consuming.

The student was always left behind by others, making him discouraged. That made Amberlynn think about how she can help students with Autism, Down syndrome, and dyslexia (ADHD).

Most of the children with these disabilities experience difficulties doing their assignments since they cannot be able to write answers in their worksheets for different reasons.

The app is free. So far, there has been one and half million downloads of the app. The company has advanced without any aid, except for a ten thousand dollar donation from World Domination Summit Foundation.

The Pro version of the app enables teachers and students to connect and send the assignments once they complete them. It also gives them an option of uploading the homework and submitting it via email or other file sharing options.

According to Amberlynn, the student with dysgraphia could undertake his assignments with ease by taking pictures of the worksheets and answering through the iPad keyboard. His parents, occupational therapist and teachers were excited about it. They were all happy seeing him use the app. That has enabled him to go at the phase of others in the class. He’s no longer left behind, and this makes him confident.

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