Dutch Blockchain Hackathon draws 500 participants

Dutch Blockchain Hackathon draws 500 participants

More than 500 people from all over the world gathered in Groningen, the Netherlands to compete in the world`s largest blockchain hackathon.The eve

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More than 500 people from all over the world gathered in Groningen, the Netherlands to compete in the world`s largest blockchain hackathon.

The event lasted 48 hours, in which fifty-five teams worked on problems such as the future of pensions, digital identity, energy transition, reinventing government and international trade business.

Some of the projects were socially-oriented. For instance, there was an identification app to find refugees and ways to enhance democracy. Rutger van Zuidam, the founder of DutchChain and one of the event organizers, noted that the participants will change society, as reported by cryptocoinnews.com.

Dutch bank ING was also present at the event as one of the hackathon`s strategic partners. Their “Cash me if you can” game pushed participants to identify a vulnerability ING installed in blockchain. The first to find the vulnerability was the team of B9 Labs that won a workshop with ING`s innovation coaches in Amsterdam.

“They all want to change the world. That’s amazing.”, said Joost Van Keulen, vice mayor of Groningen who attended the hackathon.

“Clearly, the sky is the limit.”, added Professor Alexander Rinnooov Kan, a member of the Senate in the Dutch Parliament who was also present at the event.

Some of the winners were team ToBlockchain, team SocialFabric and team Zissou.

ToBlockchain won the energy stream track with an app that controls access to energy data. It allows users to decide, if they want to use, share or store their energy.

Team SocialFabric earned 20 bitcoins by winning the identity track. Their project helps refugees, governments and non-governmental organizations. Refugees, for example, can use the platform to create a digital identity that may be tracked by authorities.

The international trade and entrepreneurship track was won by team Zissou. They created an app which sets contracts between freelancers and clients. By using the app, freelancers can benefit from indisputable and easily auditable contracts and avoid fines from the Dutch IRS.

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