Blockchain technology to make the food industry more transparent

Blockchain technology to make the food industry more transparent

London-based company Provenance uses the blockchain technology to verify the origins of food sold in supermarkets. “We envision a future where ever

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London-based company Provenance uses the blockchain technology to verify the origins of food sold in supermarkets.

“We envision a future where every great product, from a bottle of wine to a pair of jeans, comes with accessible, verifiable information about its history and creation.”, according to Provenance`s official website (provenance.org).

Founded by Jessi Baker (CEO) and Ian Kynnersley (CTO), the company successfully followed the supply chains of tuna fished in Indonesia by the help of blockchain. With human rights abuses quite common in the seafood industry, Provenance may be a step towards a more sustainable business.

“Building in mechanisms to deliver transparency from net to plate is central to eradicating illegal, unsustainable fishing and the human rights abuses that have plagued parts of the seafood production sector,” said Steve Trent, executive director at the Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF), in an interview with the Guardian (theguardian.com).

According to the Guardian, buying and selling of fish is currently tracked by paper records and tags on the seafood. Local fishermen are now able to send SMS messages and register their catch on the blockchain. Then, the supplier receives this identification along with the fish. Finally, customers can access and verify the fish`s journey through the supply chain.

“Provenance helps reinforce the work of sustainability standards organisations, auditors, NGOs and governments by making information about businesses and products open, accessible and trustworthy.”, states the company on their website.

The Co-op Food group collaborates with the UK – based start-up on other fresh food trails. Provenance has also launched the Fashion Revolution project, which will help customers discover who made their clothes.

The blockchain technology backs-up such initiatives as it may detail the origins of the products and make them accessible to the consumers.

“At the risk of depleting many of the planet’s resources and further harming the environment, a re-imagination of how we produce and use materials is more vital than ever.”, said Provenance on their website.

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