Ads Or Mining? It’s Up To You!

Ads Or Mining? It’s Up To You!

Online media website Salon offers its visitor ad-free experience on the condition it uses their computers to mine cryptocurrency. Everyone surfing the internet would agree that ads are being a drag but should we let someone else use our computing power?

How To Protect Our Devices From Cryptojacking And Mining Scripts
Coinhive Found In Starbucks’ Wi-Fi Networks
Coinhive Found In DoubleClick Ad Campaigns

Online media website Salon offers its visitor ad-free experience on the condition it uses their computers to mine cryptocurrency. Everyone surfing the internet would agree that ads are being a drag but should we let someone else use our computing power?

Salon has long been dependent on advertisements and has recently come across the alternative method of raising funds. As the authors note in the blog post, ads are not what the used to be, hence media websites are no longer generating enough revenue through them. This is why regular visitors can choose to either mine for the outlet or be exposed to advertisements.

Despite it is not explicitly said, The Verge suggests that Salon is using the Coinhive open-source software to utilize visitors’ CPU power. Yet, it is another way to pay for content. The mining power of all devices combined is tremendous and Salon wants to put it to work not only to sustain its platform but to support the development of blockchain technologies and cryptocurrencies.

Salon is not the first website to see the potential of mining scripts but unlike others, it explicitly notifies visitors for its actions. Furthermore, each reader is able to choose between ads and mining. Another major difference between the media outlet approach and the malicious scripts is that it detects the device power usage and adapts the mining settings in such a way that the user does not experience sluggish browsing.

Coinhive is obscured by notoriety due to its reckless use by hackers looking to get quick-rich. It has been embedded in several Starbucks locations, government websites and ad banners illegally and used visitors’ CPUs without a notice. Quite surprisingly, its developers state that they had never expected people would abuse their software in such a way.

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0