A Blockchain Project Saves 20 K Free Berkley Videos

A Blockchain Project Saves 20 K Free Berkley Videos

The Department of Justice has forced University of California (UC) Berkley to delete 20 K free videos they have posted on YouTube, according to an art

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The Department of Justice has forced University of California (UC) Berkley to delete 20 K free videos they have posted on YouTube, according to an article published in cryptocoinnews.com and washingtontimes.com.

As the Department of Justice found, the videos violate Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act because they didn`t have closed captioning (subtitles).

“This move will also partially address recent findings by the Department of Justice, which suggests that the YouTube and iTunes U content meet higher accessibility standards as a condition of remaining publicly available.”, said Cathy Koshland, vice chancellor for undergraduate education.

“Finally, moving our content behind authentication allows us to better protect instructor intellectual property from ‘pirates’ who have reused content for personal profit without consent.”, Ms. Koshland added.

Still, updating 20,000 videos would be “extremely expensive” and unwise in an environment of “substantial budget deficits and shrinking state financial support”, commented she in September.

A group of blockchain enthusiasts , however, decided to  put the 20,000 videos on a blockchain based decentralized YouTube called LBRY (pronounced as libre or library). In this way, the information will not be lost.

“The bittorrent part isn’t too different from bittorrent.”, commented Reilly Smith, a Curator and content liaison for LBRY.

It works in the following way: users store whatever content they like on their laptops and then share it with others, if they want by downloading the library software.

Yet, it is different from bittorrent because the decentralized library in a YouTube like platform. Users can upload videos or other content, while browsing front pages and using the search option. Underneath, this CGI navigation is realized through blockchain technology.

“The blockchain is the database for all the content on the network. The URI + the associated metadata is stored on it. So when you want to find some or stream something, you find it on the blockchain and extract the relevant information, which in turns allows you to (1) pay the publisher – or not if it’s free, like a lot of things – (2) thereby initiating the stream in an otherwise YouTube-like experience.”, as  Smith said.

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